Book chapter in Turning Points in Compassion

I was honoured to be asked to contribute a chapter to the following book, which has just been published:

Turning Points in Compassion is the culmination of 4 years work in compiling stories, interview and articles of some of the most progressive animal rights advocates. This inspirational collection of personal stories challenges our widespread perceptions about our relationship with animals.

With a powerful blend of compassion and honesty, the writers in Turning Points in Compassion share pivotal moments that were life changing. Their description of a life lived with awareness of animals as equally feeling beings who have conscious awareness and lives that matter to them will touch the hearts of people everywhere.

No readers will be left unchallenged by this book. This is the perfect gift for Christmas! For more information visit: www.turningpointsincompassion.info.”

Article: veterinary specialisations in animal welfare

My article ‘Pathways to specialising in animal welfare’ has just been published in Vet Record [UK], describing post-graduate qualifications and routes to specialisation in animal welfare that currently exist for veterinarians in the US, Europe and Australia and New Zealand. In particular, it describes how suitably experienced veterinarians can (for a limited time) seek accreditation through the new American and European speciality colleges covering this field, without undertaking a formal programme of study (such as a residency). I’m unable to post the full PDF here for copyright reasons but please contact me if you’d like access to the full article.

Adventure: Booby Island swim

I've explored a lot of my current Caribbean island of St Kitts, and some of the neighbouring island Nevis. What was left? Booby Island of course - in the 4 km wide ‘Narrows' between St Kitts and Nevis. I didn’t have a sea kayak, pirate ship or even magic carpet, but I still had my trusty fins. And so began another epic adventure...

Presentation: animal use in research and teaching

Some scientists claim animal experiments are essential for advancing human healthcare. Yet thousands of patients have been harmed by pharmaceuticals developed using animal tests. Some claim all experiments are conducted humanely, to high scientific standards. Yet, a wealth of studies have revealed that laboratory animals suffer significant stress, which may distort experimental results. Where, then, does the truth lie? How useful are such experiments in advancing human healthcare? How much do animals suffer as a result? And what level of animal use is necessary for students who wish to become successful veterinarians? In this presentation I describe my quest to become a veterinarian without harming animals, and the findings within my recent book, The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments. If this interests you then please join me at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, Wed. 24 Sep., 12-1, classroom 1.

Interview: Vet Rec Careers

In Vet Record Careers [UK], I describe the development of my career, and my interest in veterinary cryptozoology.